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Biosyn Cell line contamination has been plaguing researchers since the beginning of the discipline.1 Only recently has technology caught up to the problem and provided precise and affordable preventative measures. Even a few years ago, this problem was still going unidentified in even the most esteemed publications: Biosyn
     
 
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Biosyn The prestigious breast cancer cell line MCF-7/AdrR were distributed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) due to their resistance to many different drugs in the NCI-60 panel. This cell line was used in many studies of breast cancer cells, and in 2000, were found to be ovarian cancer cells and not breast cancer cells at all. Liscovitch and Rabin, who uncovered this fiasco, estimate that there are perhaps 300 published studies that relied upon this misidentified cell line.1,2  
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Biosyn In 2009, a team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco led by Osamu Tetsu found that several adenoid cystic carcinoma cell lines, ACC2, ACC3, ACCM, ACCNS, ACCS, and CAC2, which had all been widely used in research, had been misidentified or contaminated at different times. As of 2010, all six are still in use.3  
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  The scientific community first learned about the problem of cell line contamination over forty years ago, when methods of detection were limited to slow and expensive processes, such as karyotyping and the identification of biochemical polymorphisms. Even the advent of DNA fingerprinting in the 1990s did not provide a practical and cost-effective solution.  
     
  “We are fortunate that STR technology is available,” says Dr. Miguel Castro, CEO of Bio-Synthesis, Inc., who goes on to say that Bio-Synthesis's own affordable STR technology can “unequivocally” identify cell lines and contain cross contamination potentially making cell line contamination a thing of the past.  
     
  The ATCC and increasing numbers of journals, notably Biotechniques, Cancer Research, and In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology now require authentication on all cell lines used in studies submitted for publication. Nature requires STR data on human embryonic stem cell lines.4 The FDA is even more strict, requiring cell line authentication as a condition of drug approval.5  
     
 
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Biosyn Bio-Synthesis is pleased to offer an affordable cell line authentication service that goes above and beyond the requirements of the above organizations, providing customers with a complete package of precision and convenience. Biosyn
     
  Bio-Synthesis's cell line authentication service uses 16 markers in total to identify cross-contamination among human cells. The proprietary methods used by Bio-Synthesis can detect interspecies contamination between pigs, human, cats, Chinese hamsters, Rhesus monkeys, sheep, horses, African green monkeys, rats, dogs, mice, rabbits, goats and cows. Customers can expect turnaround in 4-5 days, with a 48-hour rush service available upon request.  
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Biosyn Detect mycoplasma contamination
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Biosyn Detect known mutations and analyze candidate genes
Biosyn Detect intra- and inter-species contamination
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Biosyn Enjoy multiple-platform technology in accredited facilities
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Database of Misidentified Cell Lines:
Misidentified
Cell Line
Claimed
Species
Purported
Cell Type
Contaminating
Cell Line
Actual
Species
Actual
Cell Type
Misidentification
Reported By
PubMed ID
2474/90 Human Gastric
carcinoma
HT-29 Human Colon
carcinoma
MacLeod et al.,
1999
10508494
2563 (MAC-21) Human Lung
carcinoma
HeLa Human Cervical
adenocarcinoma
Nelson-Rees et al.,
1981
6451928
2957/90 Human Gastric
carcinoma
HT-29 Human Colon
carcinoma
MacLeod et al.,
1999
10508494
3051/80 Human Gastric
carcinoma
HT-29 Human Colon
carcinoma
MacLeod et al.,
1999
10508494
41M Human Ovarian
carcinoma
OAW 28 Human Ovarian carcinoma Wilson et al., 1996 8795574
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  View Complete Database of Cross-Contaminated and Misidentified Cell Lines  
  Version 6.5 : by Amanda Capes-Davis and R.. Ian Freshney  
  Mention CellLine 41511 at checkout to receive a 10% discount.  
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1. Chatterjee, Rhitu. "Cases of Mistaken Identity." Science 315. 16 Feb. (2007): 928-31. Web. 21 Mar. 2011.  
2. Nardone, Roland et al. "An Open Letter Regarding the Misidentification and Cross-Contamination of Cell Lines: Significance and Recommendations for Correction." Open letter to Secretary Michael O. Levitt of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Jul 11, 2007.  
3. Podolak, Erin. "Ending cell line contamination by cutting off researchers." BioTechniques.com 10 Aug 2010. Web. 18 Mar 2011.  
4. Dunham, Jill Harley. "DOING GOOD SCIENCE: AUTHENTICATING CELL LINE IDENTITY." Cell Notes 22 (2008): 15-17. Web. 18 Mar 2011.  
5. Wanjek, Christopher. The problem, policy, history and fix: Cleaning Up Cell-Line Cross-Contamination. The NIH Catalyst. March-April 2008. Web. 29 Sep 2010.  
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